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Contents (2001 - 648)
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Occupational Health and Safety Regulation 2001
Repealed version for 7 June 2011 to 31 December 2011 (accessed 16 September 2019 at 22:30)
Chapter 7
Chapter 7 Hazardous processes
Note.
 This Chapter imposes obligations on an employer. Employer, for the purposes of this Chapter, includes self-employed persons (see clause 3).
Chapter 2 (Places of work—risk management and other matters) contains further obligations in relation to the provision of personal protective equipment, emergency arrangements and first aid facilities by employers.
Part 5.4 (Working with plant) contains provisions in relation to the maintenance and repair of plant.
Part 6.4 (Use of hazardous substances) contains further obligations in relation to the use of hazardous substances at places of work.
Part 7.1 Spray painting
176   Definitions
In this Part:
electrostatic spray painting means spray painting using an electrically-charged spray painting substance.
spray booth means a structure that is designed to:
(a)  enclose or otherwise accommodate articles being spray painted, and
(b)  control hazards of dust, mist, aerosols, fumes or flammable vapours generated by spray painting by use of appropriate exhaust ventilation, and
(c)  provide for the prevention of ignition sources,
being a structure that is used only for the purpose of spray painting.
spray painting means the process of spraying a spray painting substance that has been converted into a mist or aerosol onto a surface, whether for decoration, preservation, insulation or otherwise.
spray painting substance means a substance used in spray painting and includes, but is not limited to, paints, powders, lacquers, paint removers, rust converters and removers, surface preparation and removers, surface preparation products, resins, solvents and thinners.
176A   Application
This Part applies in addition to the other provisions of this Regulation.
Note.
 In particular, see clause 164 (Use of hazardous substances) which prohibits the use of certain hazardous substances in spray painting and clause 165 (Employer to provide health surveillance) which requires employers to provide health surveillance if there is a risk to health through exposure to hazardous substances.
177   Spray painting in spray booths—particular risk control measures
An employer must ensure that:
(a)  spray painting is carried out in a spray booth, and
(b)  no persons (other than persons required to be in the spray booth as part of the spraying process) are in a spray booth during spray painting, and
(c)  any persons in a spray booth during spray painting are wearing appropriate personal protective equipment.
Maximum penalty: Level 3.
Note.
 See clause 51 (Atmospheric contaminants—particular risk control measures) for prohibition of exposure to atmospheric contaminants above specified exposure levels.
178   Spray painting outside spray booths—particular risk control measures
(1)  This clause applies to spray painting other than spray painting carried out in a spray booth.
Note.
 Despite clause 177 (a), an employer may carry out spray painting other than in a spray booth if compliance with that clause is not reasonably practicable (see clause 6A).
(2)  An employer must ensure that spray painting to which this clause applies:
(a)  is carried out in the open air at least 6 metres from every building and from every other thing that might obstruct ventilation, and
(b)  is effectively isolated from every other process in which persons are employed and that is within 6 metres (measured in any direction) from the place at which the spray painting substance is being applied, and
(c)  is effectively isolated from all plant, machinery and equipment that is, or may become, a source of ignition and that is within 2 metres, measured vertically above, and 6 metres, measured in other directions, from the place at which the spray painting substance is being applied.
(3)  If it is not reasonably practicable for an employer to ensure that the spray painting is carried out in the open air as required by subclause (2) (a), the employer must ensure that:
(a)  the place where the spray painting is carried out is adequately ventilated (by natural or mechanical ventilation), and
(b)  the spray painting is effectively isolated in accordance with subclause (2) (b) and (c).
(4)  For the purposes of this clause, spray painting is not effectively isolated:
(a)  from another process if a substance from the spray painting can be inhaled by a person engaged in the other process, or
(b)  from plant, machinery or equipment if there is a risk that a substance from the spray painting will be ignited by a source of ignition from or associated with the plant, machinery or equipment.
(5)  An employer must ensure that persons carrying out spray painting to which this clause applies are wearing appropriate personal protective equipment.
Maximum penalty: Level 3.
179   Electrostatic spray painting—particular risk control measures
(1)  An employer must ensure that equipment used to carry out electrostatic spray painting is provided with automatic controls that will, if any conveyor carrying articles through the high voltage electric field stops:
(a)  disconnect the power supply to any high voltage transformer used in the process, and
(b)  give a warning of the stoppage.
(2)  An employer must ensure that, if electrostatic spray painting is carried out using a hand-held device, the following items are effectively earthed:
(a)  the handle of the device,
(b)  the articles being painted,
(c)  if the painting is carried out in a spray booth:
(i)  all metal work of the booth, and
(ii)  all metal articles inside the booth or within 2 metres of the booth.
(3)  An employer must ensure that a clearly legible warning notice bearing the words “DANGER—HIGH VOLTAGE” is exhibited in a clearly visible position on equipment used to carry out electrostatic spray painting.
(4)  An employer must ensure that equipment used to carry out electrostatic spray painting cannot be used unless the exhaust system is in operation.
Maximum penalty: Level 3.
Part 7.2 Abrasive blasting
180   Definitions
In this Part:
abrasive blasting means the process of cleaning, smoothing, roughening, cutting, preparing or removing the surface, or part of the surface, of any article or building by means of blasting, blowing, throwing or otherwise propelling an abrasive substance against the article or building, including the propelling of an abrasive substance by means of blasting steam or water at a high pressure.
abrasive blasting enclosure means a structure that is designed to:
(a)  enclose or otherwise accommodate articles being abrasive blasted, and
(b)  isolate or minimise hazards of dusts or debris generated by abrasive blasting, and
(c)  provide for the prevention of ignition sources, and
(d)  safely filter and discharge any exhaust ventilation to a suitable point outside the workplace,
being a structure that is used only for the purpose of abrasive blasting.
abrasive substance means any substance used as an abrasive for the purpose of abrasive blasting.
181   Application
This Part applies in addition to the other provisions of this Regulation.
182   Abrasive blasting—particular risk control measures
(1)  An employer must ensure that:
(a)  abrasive blasting is carried out in an abrasive blasting enclosure if reasonably practicable, and
(b)  no persons (other than persons required to be in the abrasive blasting enclosure as part of the blasting process) are in an abrasive blasting enclosure during abrasive blasting, and
(c)  any persons in an abrasive blasting enclosure during abrasive blasting are wearing appropriate personal protective equipment.
(2)  If it is not reasonably practicable to carry out abrasive blasting in an abrasive blasting enclosure, an employer must ensure that:
(a)  any area exposed to dust is minimised, and
(b)  adequate signs to warn of the hazards of the blasting are provided, and
(c)  persons not carrying out the blasting are not permitted to enter an area in which there is a risk of exposure to atmospheric contaminants, and
(d)  persons carrying out the blasting are wearing appropriate personal protective equipment.
Maximum penalty: Level 3.
183   Supply of respirators and personal protective equipment
(1)  An employer must ensure that persons who are carrying out abrasive blasting and who may be exposed to atmospheric contaminants arising from the blasting are provided with an air supplied respirator if the persons may be exposed to atmospheric contaminants exceeding the appropriate exposure standard referred to in clause 51 (Atmospheric contaminants—particular risk control measures).
(2)  An employer must ensure that other persons (including those carrying out maintenance or repair work on abrasive blasting equipment) who may be exposed to atmospheric contaminants arising from abrasive blasting are provided with appropriate personal protective equipment if the persons may be exposed to atmospheric contaminants exceeding the appropriate exposure standard referred to in clause 51.
Maximum penalty: Level 3.
Note.
 Also see clause 15 (Provision by an employer of personal protective equipment).
184   Control of substances used in abrasive blasting
An employer must ensure that substances that may result in the exposure of persons to atmospheric contaminants exceeding the appropriate exposure standard referred to in clause 51 are not used for the purpose of abrasive blasting.
Maximum penalty: Level 3.
Part 7.3 Welding
185   Definition
In this Part:
welding includes any metal welding or similar process, such as fusion welding (including arc welding, gas welding and laser beam welding), spot welding, braze welding and thermal cutting (including oxygen and plasma cutting).
186   Application
This Part applies in addition to the other provisions of this Regulation.
187   Exposure to atmospheric contaminants and other hazards—particular risk control measures
(1)  An employer must ensure that exposure of persons to atmospheric contaminants arising from welding, including fumes, gases and vapours emitted from materials consumed during welding and from materials being welded, is controlled by use of one or more of the following measures (in descending order of priority):
(a)  substituting a less hazardous process, material or procedure,
(b)  using appropriate ventilation.
(2)  An employer must ensure that persons directly involved in welding are wearing appropriate personal protective equipment.
(3)  An employer must ensure that adequate signs to warn of the hazards are provided at or near any area in which there is a risk of exposure of persons to hazards arising from welding.
Maximum penalty: Level 3.
188   Supply of respirators
An employer must ensure that any person who may be exposed to atmospheric contaminants arising from welding, including fumes, vapours or gases emitted from materials consumed during welding and from materials being welded, is provided with suitable respiratory protection if the person may be exposed to atmospheric contaminants exceeding the appropriate exposure standard referred to in clause 51 (Atmospheric contaminants—particular risk control measures).
Maximum penalty: Level 3.
Note.
 Also see clause 15 (Provision by an employer of personal protective equipment).
189   Ultraviolet radiation—particular risk control measures
An employer must ensure that risks associated with exposure of persons to harmful levels of ultraviolet radiation at or near the site of welding are controlled by use of the following measures (in descending order of priority):
(a)  using appropriate screens to provide protection from ultraviolet radiation,
(b)  ensuring that persons required to be in an area in which there is a risk of exposure to ultraviolet radiation are wearing appropriate protective equipment,
(c)  ensuring that persons who are not carrying out welding are not permitted to enter an area in which there is a risk of exposure to ultraviolet radiation and that adequate signs to warn of the hazards are provided.
Maximum penalty: Level 3.
Part 7.4 Electroplating
190   Definition
In this Part:
electroplating means the process of applying a deposit of metal onto an article, or any part of an article, by electrolytic means, including the ancillary process of polishing, brightening or cleaning the article by electrolytic or chemical means.
191   Application
This Part applies in addition to the other provisions of this Regulation.
192   Exposure to atmospheric contaminants and other hazards—particular risk control measures
(1)  An employer must ensure that exposure of persons to atmospheric contaminants arising from electroplating is controlled by use of one or more of the following measures (in descending order of priority):
(a)  substituting a less hazardous process, material or procedure,
(b)  using appropriate ventilation or fume suppressants, or both.
(2)  An employer must ensure that, if the persons exposed to atmospheric contaminants arising from electroplating are persons involved in the cleaning or maintenance of equipment used in electroplating, the exposure is controlled by using appropriate ventilation and the provision of appropriate personal protective equipment.
(3)  An employer must ensure that adequate provision is made to minimise the consequences of dangerous spills or splashes arising from electroplating by the supply, appropriate to the level of risk, of spill kits, safety showers, eye wash and personal protective equipment for splash protection.
(4)  An employer must ensure that adequate signs to warn of the hazards are provided at or near any area in which there is a risk of exposure of persons to hazards arising from electroplating.
(5)  An employer must ensure that persons who are not carrying out electroplating are not permitted to enter an area in which there is a risk of exposure to hazards arising from electroplating.
Maximum penalty: Level 3.
193   Labelling of containers
An employer must ensure that every container of a substance (whether hazardous or not) used in electroplating is clearly labelled with the name of the substance at all times.
Maximum penalty: Level 3.
Note.
 This clause is in addition to clauses 156 (Supplier to ensure hazardous substances are labelled) and 163 (Employer to ensure containers are labelled) (to the extent that those clauses apply to the containers referred to in the clause).
194   Cyanide—particular risk control measures
An employer must ensure that any electroplating process involving cyanide complies with the following:
(a)  containers of corrosives involved in the process must be separated from any container of cyanide by at least one water rinse tank,
(b)  cyanide not being used in the process must be kept in containers that are stored in a manner that prevents them from coming into contact with a liquid,
(c)  containers of corrosives not directly involved in the process must not be kept in a storage area in which cyanide is kept,
(d)  a person is available to provide first aid in the case of cyanide poisoning and an emergency kit suitable for treating cyanide poisoning, together with an appropriate respirator, is provided in a suitable location for use by that person,
(e)  a notice with respect to the treatment of persons for cyanide poisoning is exhibited in a suitable location where cyanide is used or stored.
Maximum penalty: Level 3.
Part 7.5 Molten metal
195   Definitions
In this Part:
molten metal work means any work process in which metals are melted, poured and moulded.
196   Application
This Part applies in addition to the other provisions of this Regulation.
197   Atmospheric contaminants and other hazards—particular risk control measures
(1)  An employer must ensure that exposure of persons to atmospheric contaminants from molten metal work, including toxic or noxious fumes, dust or gases emitted during the melting, pouring and moulding processes, is controlled by use of the following measures (in descending order of priority):
(a)  isolation of the work,
(b)  installation of extractive ventilation or measures of equivalent effectiveness.
(2)  An employer must ensure that persons directly involved in molten metal work are wearing appropriate personal protective equipment (including, where appropriate, respiratory equipment and equipment for protection against impact, radiation or heat).
(3)  An employer must ensure that adequate signs to warn of the hazards are provided at or near any area in which there is a risk of exposure of persons to hazards arising from molten metal work.
(4)  An employer must ensure that persons who are not carrying out molten metal work are not permitted to enter any area in which there is a risk of exposure to hazards arising from molten metal work.
Maximum penalty: Level 3.
198   Exposure to radiation—particular risk control measures
An employer must ensure that exposure of persons to heat and infra-red and ultra-violet radiation generated by molten metal work is controlled by use of the following measures (in descending order of priority):
(a)  isolation of the heat or radiation generating process from the work space,
(b)  shielding the persons concerned from the heat or radiation.
Maximum penalty: Level 3.
Part 7.6 Lead processes and lead risk work
199   Definitions
In this Part:
blood lead level means the concentration in whole blood expressed in micromoles per litre (µmol/L) or micrograms per decilitre (µg/dL).
lead means lead metal, inorganic lead compounds and lead salts of organic acids.
lead process means any one of the following processes:
(a)  any work that exposes a person to lead dust in air or lead fumes arising from the manufacture or handling of a dry lead compound, except galena (lead sulphide) when its character or composition remains unchanged,
(b)  any work connected with the manufacture, assembly, handling or repair of, or parts of, electric accumulators (batteries) that involves the manipulation of dry lead compounds, pasting or casting lead,
(c)  breaking up or dismantling of lead accumulators and the sorting, packing and handling of plates or other parts containing lead removed or recovered from those accumulators,
(d)  spraying with molten lead, alloys or lead paint containing more than 5 per cent by weight of lead,
(e)  melting or casting of lead alloys containing more than 5 per cent by weight of lead in which the temperature of the molten material is more than 450 degrees Celsius,
(f)  recovery of lead from its ores, oxides or other compounds by a thermal reduction process,
(g)  dry machine grinding, discing, buffing or cutting by power tools of lead or alloy containing more than 5 per cent by weight of lead,
(h)  machine sanding or buffing of surfaces coated with paint containing more than one per cent by dry weight of lead,
(i)  any process by which electric arc, oxy-acetylene, oxy gas, plasma arc or a flame is applied, for the purposes of welding, cutting or cleaning, to the surface of any metal that is coated with lead or paint containing more than one per cent by dry weight of lead,
(j)  radiator repairs if exposure to lead dust or fumes may occur,
(k)  fire assay if lead is used,
(l)  melting of lead or alloy containing more than 50 per cent lead by weight if the exposed surface area of the molten material is more than 0.1 square metres and the temperature of the molten material exceeds 450 degrees Celsius.
lead risk work means a lead process or a work activity or sequence of activities at a specific area within a place of work in which the blood lead level of an employee might reasonably be expected to rise or does rise above 1.45 µmol/L (30 µg/dL).
200   Application
This Part applies in addition to the other provisions of this Regulation.
Note.
 In particular, note that the provisions of Part 6.4 apply to the use of all hazardous substances (including lead) at work and, among other things, require employers to provide health surveillance for employees if there is a risk to health resulting from exposure to a hazardous substance. Those provisions apply whether or not the use constitutes a lead process or lead risk work for the purposes of this Part. Also note that clause 345 requires persons to give WorkCover notice of any proposed lead risk work.
201   Employer to control risks from lead
(1)  An employer at a place of work at which a lead process is carried out must ensure that contamination by lead is confined to the area in which the lead process is carried out (a lead process area) and that lead contamination of the surrounding environment does not occur.
Maximum penalty: Level 4.
(2)  An employer must ensure that:
(a)  a lead process area is kept as clean as is practicable, and
(b)  compressed air, compressed gas or dry sweeping cleaning methods are not used in a lead process area, and
(c)  no employee eats, drinks, chews gum, smokes or carries smoking materials in a lead process area, and
(d)  any eating or drinking facilities provided at the workplace cannot be contaminated with lead, and
(e)  employees working in a lead process area wear appropriate personal protective equipment, and
(f)  changing rooms and washing, showering and toilet facilities appropriate to the lead process carried out are provided and maintained in good working order, and
(g)  employees remove clothing and equipment contaminated with lead, and wash their hands and faces, before entering an area provided at the workplace for eating and drinking.
Maximum penalty: Level 3.
(3)  An employer must arrange for the laundering of protective work clothing that may have been contaminated by lead.
Maximum penalty (subclause (3)): Level 2.
202   Biological monitoring and health surveillance
(1)  In the case of lead risk work, any biological monitoring required to be performed under Part 6.4 must consist of the measurement of lead in whole blood or packed red cells, sampled as capillary or venous blood (as appropriate) and related measurements, as required.
(2)  In the case of lead risk work, health surveillance (additional to that required to be performed under Part 6.4) must be performed:
(a)  in relation to an employee who is carrying out lead risk work at 1 September 2001—as soon as practicable after that date, or
(b)  in relation to an employee who commences lead risk work after 1 September 2001:
(i)  before the employee commences the work (except biological monitoring), and
(ii)  within one month of the commencement of the work, and
(iii)  as soon as practicable after 2 months of the commencement of the work, and
(iv)  as soon as practicable after 6 months of the commencement of the work.
(3)  In the case of lead risk work, the biological monitoring required to be performed under Part 6.4 and subclause (1) must be performed at the following intervals:
(a)  for females of reproductive capacity:
(i)  within 3 months of the last biological monitoring if the result of that last monitoring shows a blood lead level of less than 0.48 µmol/L (10 µg/dL), or
(ii)  within 6 weeks of the last biological monitoring if the result of the last monitoring shows a blood lead level result of 0.48 µmol/L (10 µg/dL) or more,
(b)  for females not of reproductive capacity and males:
(i)  within 6 months of the last biological monitoring if the result of the last monitoring shows a blood lead level result of less than 1.45 µmol/L (30 µg/dL), or
(ii)  within 3 months of the last biological monitoring if the result of the last monitoring shows a blood lead level of 1.45 µmol/L (30 µg/dL) or more but less than 1.93 µmol/L (40 µg/dL), or
(iii)  within 6 weeks of the last biological monitoring if the result of the last monitoring shows a blood lead level of 1.93 µmol/L (40 µg/dL) or more.
Maximum penalty: Level 4.
203   Employer to remove certain employees from lead risk work
(1)  An employer must ensure that an employee ceases to carry out lead risk work if the employer or employee considers that the employee has received an excessive exposure to lead in the workplace and the results of biological monitoring on the employee show the confirmed blood lead level of the employee as:
(a)  0.72 µmol/L (15 µg/dL) or more for females who are pregnant or breast feeding, or
(b)  0.97 µmol/L (20 µg/dL) or more for other females of reproductive capacity, or
(c)  2.41 µmol/L (50 µg/dL) or more for females not of reproductive capacity and males.
(2)  An employer must ensure that an employee referred to in subclause (1) receives a medical examination by an authorised medical practitioner within 7 days of the employer determining that the employee should cease carrying out lead risk work.
(3)  An employer must ensure that an employee referred to in subclause (1) does not carry out lead risk work until:
(a)  the employee’s confirmed blood lead level is less than:
(i)  0.48 µmol/L (10 µg/dL) for females of reproductive capacity, or
(ii)  1.93 µmol/L (40 µg/dL) for females not of reproductive capacity and males, and
(b)  the employee is certified as fit to return to lead risk work by an authorised medical practitioner.
(4)  An employer must keep a record that includes the following particulars:
(a)  the date on which an employee ceased to carry out lead risk work in accordance with this clause and the date on which the employee recommenced such work,
(b)  the name, sex and date of birth of the employee.
Note.
 The record must be retained for at least 5 years. See clause 171.
(5)  In this clause:
confirmed blood lead level means the concentration of lead in venous whole blood.
Maximum penalty: Level 4.
204   Pregnant or breastfeeding employee to advise employer
An employee employed to carry out lead risk work who:
(a)  knows she is pregnant, or
(b)  is breast feeding,
must advise her employer of that fact as soon as practicable.
Maximum penalty: Level 2.
Note.
 See also clause 28 for obligation of employee to notify employer of any matter that may affect employer’s obligations under this Regulation.
Part 7.7 Electrical work
Note.
 See also Division 3 of Part 4.2 (Electricity—duties of controllers of premises) and Division 8 of Part 4.3 (Electricity—duties of employers).
205   Definitions
In this Part:
electrical installation has the same meaning as in Chapter 4.
safe work method statement means a statement that:
(a)  describes how work is to be carried out, and
(b)  identifies the work activities assessed as having safety risks, and
(c)  identifies the safety risks, and
(d)  describes the control measures that will be applied to the work activities,
and includes a description of the equipment used in the work, the standards or codes to be complied with, the qualifications of the personnel doing the work and the training required to do the work.
Note.
 See Chapter 2 for provisions relating to the identification, assessment and control of risks.
206   Application
This Part applies in addition to the other provisions of this Regulation.
207   Electrical work on electrical installations—safety measures
(1)  An employer must ensure that any electrical work on an electrical installation at a place of work is carried out using a safe system of work.
(2)  An employer must ensure that such work is not carried out while the circuits and apparatus of the part of the installation that is being worked on are energised.
(3)  The safe system of work must include:
(a)  checks to ensure that the circuits and apparatus of the part of the installation that is being worked on are not energised before work commences and remain that way until the work is completed, and
(b)  measures to eliminate or control the risk of the person carrying out the work inadvertently contacting any part of the installation that remains energised.
(4)  Despite subclause (2), electrical work on an electrical installation may be carried out while the circuits and apparatus of the part of the installation that is being worked on are energised if it is necessary to do so in the interests of safety and the risk of harm would be greater if the circuits and apparatus were de-energised before work commenced. In these circumstances the employer must ensure that:
(a)  before the work is commenced, a written risk assessment has been completed in respect of the work in consultation with the persons proposing to do the work, and
(b)  the work is carried out in accordance with a safe work method statement for the work, and
(c)  the work has been authorised by the person in control of the premises, and
(d)  the persons doing the work are appropriately qualified, trained and instructed in safe work practices for the particular task, including the proper use of test equipment, tools, accessories and personal protective equipment, and
(e)  appropriate test equipment and tools and accessories are provided to the persons doing the work, are properly used and are well maintained, and
(f)  appropriate clothing and personal protective equipment for the work are provided to the persons doing the work and are properly worn and used, and
(g)  the isolation point of the relevant electrical supply has been clearly identified and is able to be reached and operated quickly without any need to negotiate or remove obstacles, and
(h)  the work area is clear of obstruction so as to enable entry and exit quickly and safely, and
(i)  unauthorised persons are prevented from entering the work area by signage or barriers, or both, and
(j)  the work is undertaken in the presence of a safety observer who is competent to perform the particular task that is to be carried out and is competent in electrical rescue and cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, and
(k)  in the case of electrical work at a mining workplace or coal workplace, notice is given of the proposed work, at least 7 days before the work commences, to an inspector appointed in relation to the mining workplace or coal workplace.
(5)  This clause does not apply to electrical work carried out under a plan required to be lodged under the Electricity Supply (Safety and Network Management) Regulation 2002 or to electrical testing referred to in clause 208.
Maximum penalty: Level 4.
208   Electrical testing on electrical installations—safety measures
(1)  An employer must ensure that persons conducting tests for the integrity and operability of energised circuits and apparatus of an electrical installation at a place of work conduct the tests in a safe manner.
(2)  Without limiting the generality of subclause (1), the employer must ensure that:
(a)  a safe system of work is used that includes:
(i)  a risk assessment in respect of the tests, and
(ii)  measures to eliminate or control the risk of the persons conducting the tests inadvertently contacting any part of the installation that is energised (including safe work practices to minimise the risk of inadvertent contact, if the risk cannot be eliminated), and
(b)  appropriate test equipment is provided and properly used by appropriately trained persons, and
(c)  appropriate personal protective equipment is provided and used by the persons conducting the tests, and
(d)  if necessary to minimise a risk identified by the risk assessment, the tests are conducted in the presence of a safety observer who is competent to assist the persons who are conducting the tests and who is competent in electrical rescue and cardio-pulmonary resuscitation.
Maximum penalty: Level 4.