Legal Profession Act 2004 No 112
Current version for 4 July 2014 to date (accessed 26 November 2014 at 12:25)

349   Onus of showing facts provided reasonable prospects of success

(1)  If the court (the trial court) hearing proceedings on a claim for damages finds that the facts established by the evidence before the court do not form a basis for a reasonable belief that the claim or the defence had reasonable prospects of success, there is a presumption for the purposes of this Division that legal services provided on the claim or the defence (as appropriate) were provided without reasonable prospects of success.
(2)  If the Supreme Court (when the Supreme Court is not the trial court) is satisfied, either as a result of a finding of the trial court or otherwise on the basis of the judgment of the trial court, that the facts established by the evidence before the trial court do not form a basis for a reasonable belief that the claim or the defence had reasonable prospects of success, there is a presumption for the purposes of this Division that legal services provided on the claim or the defence (as appropriate) were provided without reasonable prospects of success.
(3)  A presumption arising under this section is rebuttable and a person seeking to rebut it bears the onus of establishing that at the time legal services were provided there were provable facts (as provided by section 345 (Law practice not to act unless there are reasonable prospects of success)) that provided a basis for a reasonable belief that the claim or the defence on which they were provided had reasonable prospects of success.
(4)  A law practice or legal practitioner associate of the practice may, for the purpose of establishing that at the time legal services were provided there were provable facts (as provided by section 345 (Law practice not to act unless there are reasonable prospects of success)) that provided a basis for a reasonable belief that the claim or the defence on which they were provided had reasonable prospects of success, produce information or a document despite any duty of confidentiality in respect of a communication between the law practice or a legal practitioner associate of the practice and a client, but only if:
(a)  the client is the client to whom the legal services were provided or consents to its disclosure, or
(b)  the court is satisfied that it is necessary for the law practice or associate to do so in order to rebut a presumption arising under this section.
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